david berry

Writer • Editor • Designer

Criticism

Atlanta’s finest “the f—k you just say?” face almost definitely belongs to Bryan Tyree Henry, right.

Atlanta’s finest “the f—k you just say?” face almost definitely belongs to Bryan Tyree Henry, right.

The silent wonder of Atlanta

"Some of the most purely comedic expressions belong to Earn (series creator Donald Glover), the human half-shrug that is the closest this winding, discursive, shaggy story has to a centre. A lack of affect is his essential quality, such as he has one, and the situations he finds himself in that seem to demand a slightly glazed-over nonchalance – coloured with the faintest shades of disappointment, contempt, confusion, archness or just sort of a weary resignation, as warranted – just keep rolling on by. The stakes aren’t often much more than just getting through the next 15 minutes, but the cumulative effect is cosmic: this is a universe that demands a certain dry dismissal to keep from a full-on meltdown." - On the importance of reactions in Donald Glover's brilliant FX Series, for the National Post


The natural habitat for a Chick tract was on a bus seat, discarded.

The natural habitat for a Chick tract was on a bus seat, discarded.

The illustrated ignorance of Jack T. Chick

"Even by the standards of rock-ribbed Bible thumpers, Chick was a fringe literalist, the kind of person whose opinions land somewhere between sledgehammer satire of a Christian fundamentalist and surrealist protest against sense entirely. Among the un- or less-believers, Chick was mainly a figure of cultish fun since the ’80s, when his wild-eyed Satanic panic was briefly a mainstream concern." - The legacy of hyper-Christian tract-maker Jack T. Chick, for the National Post


“Finding peace in not knowing seems strangely more righteous than the peace that comes from knowing.”

“Finding peace in not knowing seems strangely more righteous than the peace that comes from knowing.”

Rectify finds peace in not knowing

"The ineluctable space between people is essential to the show—radiating, like its plaintive bent and glacial intensity, from Daniel’s tentative dealings with the world. Even the viewers are only allowed so close to Daniel, cut off from his life before prison and given only fleeting glimpses of what it was like inside, through flashbacks and dream sequences." - The quiet mercy of Recity, for Hazlitt